All posts tagged: Nepeta

2017 update – Accessions in this Plant Heritage National Plant Collection® of Nepeta

Updated images and plant descriptions are currently being completed. 84 Cultivars 25 Species 109 Accessions in total ‘Blue Dragon’ ‘Chettle Blue’ ‘Dropmore’ ‘Early Bird‘ ‘Florina’ ‘Hill Grounds’ ‘Joanna Reed’ ‘Junior Walker’ = ‘Novanepjun’ ‘Lamendi’ ‘Leeds Castle’ ‘Limelight’ ‘Maurice’ ‘Poseidon’ ‘Purple Haze‘ PBR ‘Rae Crug’ ‘Six Hills Giant’ ‘Six Hills Gold’ ‘Veluws Blauwtje’ ‘Weinheim Big Blue’  New 2017 buddlejifolium buddlejifolium ‘Gold Splash’ cataria cataria ‘Citriodora’ cataria ‘Lemony’ clarkei from Ethiopia govaniana granatensis grandiflora grandiflora ‘Blue Danube’ grandiflora ‘Blue Elf’  New 2016 grandiflora ‘Bramdean’ AGM grandiflora ‘Dawn to Dusk’ grandiflora ‘Pool Bank’ grandiflora ‘Summer Magic’ grandiflora ‘Wild Cat’ grandiflora ‘Zinser’s Giant’ italica kubanica latifolia  latifolia ‘Super Cat’ Longpipes hort. manchuriensis ‘Manchu Blue’ melissifolia nervosa nervosa ‘Blue Carpet’ nervosa ‘Blue Moon’ nervosa ‘Forncett Select’ nervosa ‘Pink Cat’ nuda nuda ‘Accent’ nuda ‘Alba’ nuda ‘Anne’s Choice’ nuda ‘Isis’ nuda ‘Lake Sevan‘ New 2017 nuda ‘pink form’ nuda ‘Purple Cat’ nuda ‘Romany Dusk’ nuda ‘Snow Cat’ nuda ‘Two Tone’ nuda subsp. albiflora parnassica phyllochlamys Pink Candy’ Pink Dawn’ prattii racemosa ‘Amelia’ racemosa ‘Blauknirps’  New 2016 racemosa ‘Felix’  New 2017 racemosa …

Hole’s Meadow and the Plant Heritage National Plant Collections® of Monarda and Nepeta held there

The National Plant Collections presently comprise of around 95 taxa (forms) of Monarda and 108 Nepeta.  With a fabulous view looking up to Cawsand  Beacon on the northern edge of Dartmoor, the collections are grown on part of a piece of land called Hole’s Meadow, one of the burgage plots of medieval origin in the village of South Zeal, near Okehampton and within the Dartmoor National Park. These National Plant Collections of Monarda and Nepeta were developed slowly over a number of years, with the original accessions being sourced from a wide variety of excellent nurseries from within the UK and EU as well as with seeds from the US. The Collections were awarded in early 2013 by Plant Heritage*, who also supervise their ongoing status. In order to hold a Collection, as well as other criteria, one has to maintain a minimum of three of each accession. Specialism in Monarda and Nepeta was chosen because they are both bee attractors, thus supporting the bee colonies based in the apiary on the site. When viewed together, the Collections are …

Growing Nepeta

Propagate from splitting or they easily take from softwood cuttings in summer. Some cultivars are sterile, with no viable seed. Those with viable seed germinate easily indoors from seed at around 20°C (68°F), press into the compost but do not cover. Germination time is 14 to 45 days. Alternatively, sow outside after the last frosts. Preferring poorer soil, they are best planted in full sun to partial shade, favouring well drained ground. If planted in rich soil or given too much fertilizer they are likely to grow floppy foliage without structure. Water well until established and some gardening writers also suggest pinching out the tops of young plants to encourage bushier growth, although I have never found that necessary. It is recommended to divide in spring every few years to maintain plant quality. Supports are often recommended, especially for taller and/or more mature plants as on reaching a certain height, the growth tends to fall away from the centre of the plant, but I prefer to leave them to billow over naturally. Some recommend cutting …

Choosing Nepeta

Nepetas are fabulous plants, but choosing them is far from straightforward. Most of us know the delightful billowing forms, traditionally used for border edging, with their summer time multi flowered spikes. There are though many varieties and cultivars, all with their own special reasons to vie for your attention. Even though I can’t accommodate let alone source many of them, from the around 100 forms I do grow it’s easy to notice that genetic similarity apart, most have such distinct additional characteristics that they do indeed deserve consideration on their own merit. There are forms for all parts of the herbaceous border and some for pots, from dainty tiny types reaching only 20cm high, wide tall beasts rising up to even 2m on occasion and creeping underground spreaders to perhaps reach areas not quite their intended destination. Upright, bushy, compact, open, arching, billowing, dense, drought tolerant, damp tolerant. Pink, white, yellow, lavender, blue/purple or violet flowers, many with beautiful distinguishing petal markings. Tiny flowers, vast flowers. Silver green leaves, lime leaves, many other hues of …