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2017 update – Accessions in this Plant Heritage National Plant Collection® of Monarda

There are presently 95 accessions, nearly all cultivars. Updated images and plant descriptions are currently being completed.

‘Gardenview Scarlet’ AGM
‘Twins’
‘Fireball’  PBR
‘Squaw’ AGM
‘Vintage Wine’
‘Ruby Glow’
‘Snow Queen’
‘Cambridge Scarlet’ AGM
‘Violet Queen’ AGM
‘Loddon Crown’
‘Croftway Pink’ AGM
didyma ‘Duddiscombe’
‘Marshall’s Delight’ AGM
‘Capricorn’
bradburiana ‘Maramek
‘Blaustrumpf’
didyma ‘Cranberry Lace’
didyma
fistulosa
‘Tante Polly’
didyma ‘‘Panorama Red Shades’
Baby Spice’
‘Jacob Cline’
‘Kardinal’
‘Aquarius’
‘Raspberry Wine’
Hartswood Wine’
Petite Delight’  = ‘Acpetdel’
‘Ou Charm’
‘Sugar Lace’
‘Lederstrumpf’
Mahogony’
citriodora
‘Pardon My Pink’
‘Balance’
Praerienacht’
Fishes’
Sagittarius’
Scorpion’
‘Beauty of Cobham’ AGM
‘Bergamo’
‘Rebecca’
‘Heidelerche’
‘Othello’
‘Osage’
On Parade’
Saxon Purple’
‘Mohawk’
Poyntzfield Pink’
‘Schneewittchen’
fistulosa ssp.menthifolia ‘Oswegokraut’
‘Neon’
‘Elsie’s Lavender’
Pawnee’
‘Violette’
didyma ‘‘Panorama’
‘Shelley’
‘Westacre Purple’
‘Elworthy’
‘Violacea’
‘Gewitterwolke’
‘Pink Supreme’ PBR
‘Earl Grey’
‘Adam’
bradburiana  
didyma ‘Alba’
‘Comanche’
didyma ‘Coral Reef’
‘Talud’ AGM
didyma ‘Pink Lace’  PBR
Melissa’
Petite Pink Supreme’
Purple Ann’
‘Huckleberry’
‘Camilla’
didyma ‘T&M superb mixed’
didyma ‘Pamorama mixed
punctata
menthifolia 
Petite Wonder’
‘Eugens Kirschrot’
Eugens Purpursamt’
‘Lambada’
Pardon My Purple’
‘Purpurkrone’
fistulosa x didyma ‘Trinity Purple’
‘Violetta’
‘Cherokee’
‘Feuerschopf’
fistulosa-hybrid ‘Schneewolke’
Pink Spider’
Pardon My Cerise’ NEW 2017
‘Andre Eve’ NEW 2017
‘Petite Pink Delight’ NEW 2017
‘Rose/ Poupre’ NEW 2017

 

2017 update – Accessions in this Plant Heritage National Plant Collection® of Nepeta

Updated images and plant descriptions are currently being completed.

84 Cultivars

25 Species

109 Accessions in total

‘Blue Dragon’
‘Chettle Blue’
Dropmore’
‘Early Bird
‘Florina’
‘Hill Grounds’
‘Joanna Reed’
‘Junior Walker’ = ‘Novanepjun’
‘Lamendi’
Leeds Castle’
‘Limelight’
‘Maurice’
‘Poseidon’
Purple HazePBR
‘Rae Crug’
‘Six Hills Giant’
Six Hills Gold’
‘Veluws Blauwtje’
‘Weinheim Big Blue’  New 2017
buddlejifolium
buddlejifolium ‘Gold Splash’
cataria
cataria ‘Citriodora’
cataria ‘Lemony’
clarkei
from Ethiopia
govaniana
granatensis
grandiflora
grandiflora ‘Blue Danube’
grandiflora ‘Blue Elf’  New 2016
grandiflora ‘Bramdean’ AGM
grandiflora ‘Dawn to Dusk’
grandiflora ‘Pool Bank’
grandiflora ‘Summer Magic’
grandiflora ‘Wild Cat’
grandiflora ‘Zinser’s Giant’
italica
kubanica
latifolia 
latifolia ‘Super Cat’
Longpipes hort.
manchuriensis ‘Manchu Blue’
melissifolia
nervosa
nervosa ‘Blue Carpet’
nervosa ‘Blue Moon’
nervosa ‘Forncett Select’
nervosa ‘Pink Cat’
nuda
nuda ‘Accent’
nuda ‘Alba’
nuda ‘Anne’s Choice’
nuda ‘Isis’
nuda ‘Lake SevanNew 2017
nuda ‘pink form’
nuda ‘Purple Cat’
nuda ‘Romany Dusk’
nuda ‘Snow Cat’
nuda ‘Two Tone’
nuda subsp. albiflora
parnassica
phyllochlamys
Pink Candy’
Pink Dawn’
prattii
racemosa ‘Amelia’
racemosa ‘Blauknirps’  New 2016
racemosa ‘Felix’  New 2017
racemosa ‘Grog’
racemosa ‘Little Titch’
racemosa ‘RCBAM3’
racemosa ‘Senior’
racemosa ‘Snowflake’
racemosa ‘Superba’
racemosa ‘Toria’
racemosa ‘Walker’s Low’  AGM
Racemosa AGM
racemosa alba
sibirica
sibirica ‘Altai’
sibirica ‘Blue Beauty’
sibirica ‘Souvenir d’Andre Chaudron’
stewartiana
stewartiana ‘BWJ7999’
subsessilis
subsessilis ‘Blue Dreams’
subsessilis ‘Candy Cat’
subsessilis ‘Cool Cat’
subsessilis ‘Laufen’
subsessilis ‘Nimbus’ = ‘Yanim’
subsessilis ‘Pink Dreams’
subsessilis ‘Sweet Dreams’
subsessilis ‘Washfield’
subsessillis pink-flowered
teydea
transcaucasia ‘Blue Infinity’
troodii
troodii (changed to pink)
tuberosa
Weinheim Summer Blues’ New 2017
x faassenii ‘alba’
x faassenii ‘Blue Wonder’
x faassenii ‘Crystal Cloud’  New 2016
x faassenii ‘Gletschereis’
x faassenii ‘Kit Kat’
x faassenii ‘Select’
x faassenii ‘Superba’
x faassenii AGM
yunnanensis

 

Hole’s Meadow and the Plant Heritage National Plant Collections® of Monarda and Nepeta held there

The National Plant Collections presently comprise of around 95 taxa (forms) of Monarda and 108 Nepeta. 

With a fabulous view looking up to Cawsand  Beacon on the northern edge of Dartmoor, the collections are grown on part of a piece of land called Hole’s Meadow, one of the burgage plots of medieval origin in the village of South Zeal, near Okehampton and within the Dartmoor National Park.

These National Plant Collections of Monarda and Nepeta were developed slowly over a number of years, with the original accessions being sourced from a wide variety of excellent nurseries from within the UK and EU as well as with seeds from the US. The Collections were awarded in early 2013 by Plant Heritage*, who also supervise their ongoing status. In order to hold a Collection, as well as other criteria, one has to maintain a minimum of three of each accession.

Specialism in Monarda and Nepeta was chosen because they are both bee attractors, thus supporting the bee colonies based in the apiary on the site. When viewed together, the Collections are at their best from mid July to mid August, although the flowering season begins in late May/ early June for Nepeta and late June/ early July for Monarda.

Visitors to the Collections are very welcome, with the garden open each year for The National Garden Scheme, or to arrange a group visit. The village serves visitors extremely well with two local pubs; The Kings Arms and The Oxenham Arms plus a cafe at The Store, the village’s shop. There are further facilities in the neighbouring villages.

* Plant Heritage defines a National Collection as: “A National Plant Collection entails the stewardship of a well defined set of plants in cultivation that represents part of our national heritage.”

2016 Herb List

borago-pygmaea-1

Achillea ‘The Beacon’ Yarrow ‘The Beacon’
Achillea ageratum English Mace
Achillea millefolium Common Yarrow
Achillea millefolium ‘Bloodstone’ Yarrow ‘Bloodstone’
Achillea millefolium ‘Lilac Beauty’ Yarrow ‘Lilac Beauty’
Achillea millefolium ‘Rosie’ Yarrow ‘Rosie’
Achillea ptarmica Sneezewort
Aconitum napellus Monkshood
Agastache foeniculum (Pursh) Kuntze Anise Hyssop
Alchemilla vulgaris Lady’s Mantle
Allium fistulosum Welsh Onion, Japanese Leek
Allium schoenoprasum Fine white chives
Allium schoenoprasum Chives
Allium schoenoprasum ‘Forescate’ Chives Forescate
Allium schoenoprasum ‘Polyvert’ Chives polyvert
Allium schoeonoprassum var. sibiricum Giant Chives
Allium tuberosum Garlic Chives
Aloe Vera Aloe Vera
Aloysia triphylla AGM Lemon Verbena
Anethum graveolens Dill
Angelica archangelica Angelica
Anthemis tinctoria Dyers Chamomile
Anthriscus cerefolium Chervil
Armoracia rusticana Horseradish
Armoracia rusticana ‘Variegata’ Variegated Horseradish
Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’ Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’
Artemisia abrotanum AGM Southernwood, Lads Love
Artemisia absinthium Wormwood
Artemisia Absinthium ‘Lambrook Mist’ Artemisia ‘Lambrook Mist’
Artemisia alba (camphorata) Camphor Scented Southernwood
Artemisia dracunculus French Tarragon
Artemisia pontica Artemisia Old Warrior, Roman Wormwood
Artemisia vulgaris ‘Oriental Limelight’ Janlim
Artimisia princeps Japanese Mugwort
Atriplex halimus Sea Orach
Borago officinalis Borage
Borago pygmaea Prostrate Borage, Corsican Borage
Buxus sempervirens ‘Elegantissima‘ AGM Variegated Box
Buxus sempervirens sp Box
Calamintha grandiflora Large flowered calamint
Calamintha nepeta Lesser Calamint
Calamintha nepeta ‘Blue Cloud’ Lesser calamint ‘Blue Cloud’
Calamintha nepeta ‘Lila Reise’ Lesser calamint ‘Lila Reise’
Calamintha nepeta ‘Weisser Riese’ Lesser calamint ‘Weisser Reise’ (White Giant)
Calamintha nepeta ‘White Cloud’ Lesser calamint ‘White Cloud’
Calamintha nepeta “Gottfried Kuehn’ (‘Gottfried Kuhn’) Lesser calamint ‘Gottfried Kuehn’
Cedronella canariensis Balm of Gilead
Chamaemelum nobile Roman Chamomile
Chamaemelum nobile ‘Treneague’ Chamomile Treneague/ Lawn C’
Chelone Obliqua Pink Turtlehead
Chenopodium bonus-henricus Good King Henry
Dipsacus fullonum Common Teasel
Filipendula ulmaria Meadowsweet
Filipendula ulmaria ‘Aurea’ Golden Meadowsweet
Filipendula ulmaria ‘Variegata’ Variegated Meadowsweet
Filipendula vulgaris Dropwort
Foenicum vulgare Fennel
Foenicum vulgare ‘Purpureum’ Bronze Fennel
Gallium odoratum Sweet Woodruff
Genista tinctoria Dyer’s Greenweed
Geum rivale Water Avens
Geum Rivale ‘album’ Geum Rivale ‘album’
Hamamelis Witch Hazel
Helichrysum italicum ‘Dartington’ Dartington Curry Plant
Helichrysum italicum ‘Korma’ Korma Curry Plant
Humulus lupulus ‘Aureus’ AGM Golden Hop
Hypericum perforatum St.John’s Wort
Hyssopus officinalis Hyssop, Blue Hyssop
Hyssopus officinalis ‘Roseus’ Pink hyssop
Hyssopus officinalis f. albus White Hyssop
Hyssopus officinalis subsp. Aristatus Rock Hyssop
Isatis tinctoria Woad
Laurus nobilis AGM Bay
Laurus nobilis angustifolia Narrow Leaved Bay
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Ashdown Forest’ Lavender ‘Ashdown Forest’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Folgate’ Lavender ‘Folgate’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote Pink’ Lavender ‘Hidcote Pink’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Hidcote’ AGM Lavender ‘Hidcote’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Imperial Gem’ Lavender ‘Imperial Gem’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Jean Davis’ Lavender ‘Jean Davis’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Loddon Blue’ Lavender ‘Loddon Blue’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Loddon Pink’ Lavender ‘Loddon Pink’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Miss Katherine’ English Lavender ‘Miss Katherine’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Munstead’ Lavender ‘Munstead’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Nana Alba’ Small White Lavender
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Princess Blue’ Lavender ‘Princess Blue’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Rosea’ Lavender ‘Rosea’
Lavandula angustifolia ‘Silver Mist’ Lavender ‘Silver Mist’
Lavandula lanata x angustifolia ‘Richard Grey’ Lavender ‘Richard Grey’
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Grappenhall’ Lavender ‘Grappenhall’
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Grosso’ Lavender ‘Grosso’
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Impress Purple’ Lavender ‘Impress Purple’
Lavandula x intermedia ‘Twickel Purple’ Lavender ‘Twickel Purple’
Lavandula x intermedia ‘White Hidcote’ Lavender ‘White Hidcote’
Lavandula x intermedia Dutch group (f.L.Vera) Lavender ‘Vera’
Lavandula x intermedia Old English Group English Lavender
Leonurus cardiaca Motherwort
Leucantemum vulgare Oxeye daisy
Levisticum officinale Lovage
Ligisticum scoticum Scots Lovage, Sea Lovage
Lythrum salicaria Purple Loosestrife
Lythrum virgatum ‘Rosy Gem’ Rosy Loosestrife
Malva moschata Musk Mallow
Marubium vulgare White Horehound
Melissa officinalis Lemon Balm
Mentha ‘Swiss’ Swiss mint
Mentha arvensis var. piperascens Japanese Mint
Mentha cervina Harts Pennyroyal
Mentha longifolia silver-leaved Silver Mint
Mentha pulegium Creeping Pennyroyal
Mentha pulegium ‘Upright’ Upright Pennyroyal
Mentha raripila rubra Red Raripila Mint
Mentha requienii Corsican Mint
Mentha sativa Traditional Garden Mint
Mentha spicata  Spearmint, Garden Mint
Mentha Spicata ‘Mitcham’ Mitcham Mint
Mentha spicata ‘Tashkent’ Tashkent Mint
Mentha suaveolens Apple Mint
Mentha x piperata citrata ‘Chocolate’ Chocolate Peppermint
Mentha x piperata citrata ‘Orange’ Orange Mint
Mentha x piperata f. citrata Eau de Cologne Mint
Mentha x smithiana (syn. M. rubra var. raripila) Red Mint
Micromeria fruticosa Mediterranean Rock Mint
Myrica Gale Bog Myrtle
Myrrhis odorata Sweet Cicely
Myrtus communis subsp. tarentina AGM Myrtle Tarentina
Oenothera fruticosa subsp. Glauca AGM Evening Primrose Tetragona
Origanum ‘Kent Beauty’ Oregano ‘Kent Beauty’
Origanum Laevigatum ‘Hopleys’ Oregano ‘Hopleys’
Origanum vulgare ‘Aureum Crispum’ Golden Curly Oregano
Origanum vulgare ‘Aureum’ AGM Golden Oregano/ Marjoram
Origanum vulgare ‘Compactum’ Compact Marjoram
Origanum vulgare ‘Gold Tip’ Gold Tipped Oregano
Origanum vulgare compactum Winter Marjoram
Origanum vulgare subsp. Hirtum ‘Greek Greek Oregano
Origanum x onites is pot marjoram Pot  Marjoram
Ozothamnus hookeri Kerosene Bush
Parietaria judaica Pellitory of the wall
Perovskia atriplicifolia Russian Sage
Phlomis fruticosa AGM Jerusalem Sage
Phlomis italica Narrow Leaved Jerusalem Sage
Polemonium caeruleum Jacob’s Ladder
Prunella vulgaris Selfheal
Pycnanthemum virginianum Virginia or Common Mountain Mint
Rosmarinus off. var. angustissimus ‘Benenden Blue’ AGM Rosemary ‘Benenden Blue’ AGM
Rosmarinus officinalis Rosemary
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Barbeque’ Rosemary ‘Barbeque’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Blue Lagoon’ Rosemary ‘Blue Lagoon’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Boule’ Rosemary ‘Boule’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Corsican Blue’ Rosemary ‘Corsican Blue’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Fota Blue’ Rosemary Fota Blue
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Foxtail’ Rosemary Foxtail
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Green Ginger’ Rosemary ‘Green Ginger’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Haifa’ Rosemary ‘Haifa’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Iden Blue’ Rosemary ‘Iden Blue’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Majorca Pink’ Rosemary ‘Majorca Pink’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Primley Blue’ Rosemary ‘Primley Blue’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Severn Sea’ AGM Rosemary ‘Severn Sea’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Sissinghurst BlueAGM Rosemary ‘Sissinghurst’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Sudbury Blue’ Rosemary ‘Sudbury Blue’
Rosmarinus Officinalis ‘Trusty’ Rosemary ‘Trusty’
Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Tuscan Blue’ Rosemary ‘Tuscan Blue’
Rosmarinus officinalis (prostratus group) ‘Capri’ Rosemary ‘Capri’
Rosmarinus officinalis var. albiflorus White Rosemary
Rumex acetosa Sorrel, Broad Leaved Sorrel
Rumex sanguineus var. sanguineus Red Veined Sorrel
Ruta graveolens Rue
Ruta graveolens ‘Alderley Blue’ Rue ‘Alderley Blue’
Salvia elegans ‘Scarlet Pineapple Pineapple Sage
Salvia elegans ‘Tangerine Sage’ Tangerine/ Fruit Scented Sage
Salvia lavandulifolia Lavender leaved/ Spanish sage
Salvia lavandulifolia ‘Nazareth’ Israeli Sage
Salvia microphylla var microphylla (blackcurrant sage)
Salvia officinalis Sage
Salvia officinalis ‘Extracta’ Salvia ‘Extracta’
Salvia officinalis ‘Icterina’ Golden variegated sage
Salvia Officinalis ‘Robin Hill’ Sage ‘Robin Hill’
Salvia officinalis broad-leaved Broad Leaved Sage
Salvia officinalis purpurascens AGM Purple Sage, Red Sage
Sanguisorba minor Salad Burnet
Santolina chamaecyparissus ‘Lambrook Silver’
Santolina chamaecyparissus ‘Pretty Carol’ Cotton Lavender Pretty Carol
Santolina rosmarinifolia subsp. Rosmarinifolia Green cotton lavender
Saponaria officinalis  Soapwort
Saponaria officinalis ‘Dazzler’ Variegated Soapwort
Satureja montana Winter Savory
Satureja montana ‘Purple Mountain’ Winter Savory ‘Purple Mountain’
Satureja montana citriodora Lemon savory
Satureja montana subsp. Illyrica Savory Illyrica
Satureja spicigera (syn. Satureja repanda) Creeping Savory
Scutellaria laterifolia Skullcap Virginia
Stachys officinalis Betony
Symphytum officinale Common Comfrey
Symphytum uplandicum Russian Comfrey
Symphytum uplandicum ‘Bocking 14′ Comfrey ‘Bocking 14’
Tanacetum balsamita Costmary Alecost
Tanacetum parthenium Feverfew
Tanacetum vulgare Tansy
Tanacetum vulgare ‘Silver Lace’ Silver Lace Tansy
Tanacetum vulgare var.crispum Curled Tansy
Teucrium chamaedrys L. Wall Germander
Teucrium scorodonia  Wood Sage
Teucrium scorodonia ‘Crispum’ Curly Wood Sage
Teucrium x lucidrys Hedge Germander
Thymus ‘Dartmoor’ Thyme ‘Dartmoor’
Thymus ‘Fragrantissimus’ Orange Scented Thyme
Thymus ‘Jekka’ Thyme ‘Jekka’
Thymus ‘Pink Ripple’ Thyme ‘Pink Ripple’
Thymus ‘Porlock Thyme ‘Porlock’
Thymus ‘Redstart Thyme ‘Redstart’
Thymus cilicicus Thyme ‘Sicily’
Thymus prostratus Prostrate Thyme
Thymus pseudolanuginosus Woolly Thyme
Thymus pulegioides  Broad Leaved or Large Thyme
Thymus pulegioides ‘Foxley’ Thyme ‘Foxley’
Thymus pulegioides ‘Tabor’ Thyme ‘Tabor’
Thymus serpyllum ‘Iden‘ / Thymus ‘Iden Thyme ‘Iden’
Thymus serpyllum ‘Minimus’ Thyme ‘Minimus’
Thymus serpyllum ‘Pink Chintz Thyme ‘Pink Chintz’
Thymus serpyllum ‘Russetings’ Thyme ‘Russetings’
Thymus serpyllum ‘Vey Thyme ‘Vey’
Thymus serpyllum coccineus Creeping Red Thyme
Thymus vulgaris Common Thyme
Thymus vulgaris ‘Faustini’ Thymus ‘Faustini’
Thymus x citriodorus  ‘Creeping Lemon’ Creeping Lemon Thyme
Viola odorata Sweet Violet
Viola tricolour Heartsease

Monarda in detail: A to C

541.2Monarda ‘Adam’ – Flowers cherry red (RHS 45B). Height  75cm – 1.2m. Old fashioned variety. Purple tinged bracts. Withstands dry conditions better than others.

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334.2Monarda ‘Aquarius’ – Flowers bright purple (RHS 78C). Green bracts with a purple tinge. Height 90cm – 1.3m. Introduced by  Piet Oudolf’. Mildew resistant.

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319Monarda ‘Baby Spice‘ – A low growing (height 40cm), long flowering form with pink flowers (RHS 84B)

Image copyright www.plantnu.nl

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383.3Monarda ‘Balance’ – Syn. Monarda ‘Libra’. Flowers rich rose pink (RHS 52A). Height 75cm – 1.2m. Mildew resistant. Form selected by Piet Oudolf.

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389.3Monarda ‘Beauty of Cobham’ AGM – Flowers pale purple/ pink (RHS 76A). Height to 90cm. Old fashioned variety with purple bracts. RHS Award of Garden Merit.

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390 Top 10 - No 4 'Bergamo'Monarda ‘Bergamo’ – A Dutch annual form with beautiful rich rose purple storeys of flowers and green lanceolate leaves. Height to 70cm. From Kieft Seeds, “Monarda x hybrida ‘Bergamo’ stunned the Fleuroselect judges by its earliness and magnificent new colour. This annual Monarda produces masses of intense rose-purple flowers from June to August. Monarda x hybrida ‘Bergamo’ has a neat and compact form that is beneficial to growers. This intriguing new variety also has a dwarf habit that makes it interesting as a pot item for large containers. It has good garden performance and is highly resistant to mildew.”  Source: www.fleuroselect.com

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181.2Monarda ‘Blaustrumpf’ – Syn. Monarda ‘Blue Stocking’. Flowers violet purple (RHS 80A). Height 60cm – 1.2m. Good mildew resistance. Form selected by Kayser & Siebert, Germany in 1955.

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542.2Monarda bradburiana – various synonyms. Common names Eastern Beebalm, Bradbury’s beebalm. Separate species from Monarda russeliana, which has similarities. Flowers pink/ white (RHS 84C)  with purple spots. One of the first to flower. Height 30 – 60cm. Purple tinges bracts. Will self seed. Mildew resistant. Native to central US. Details in The Plant List.

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180 Monarda bradburiana Maramek copyright www.vasteplant.beMonarda bradburiana ‘Maramek’ – Syn. Monarda russelliana ‘Maramek’.

Image copyright www.vasteplant.be

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75.2Monarda ‘Cambridge Scarlet’ AGM – Syn. Monarda didyma ‘Cambidge Scarlet’. Flowers scarlet red (RHS 46B). Height to 90cm. Bronze tinged leaves. RHS Award of Garden Merit.

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SONY DSCMonarda ‘Camilla’ – Strong mildew resistant form from Sarastro-Stauden. Light pink flowers with a height of  50-70cm.

Image copyright www.sarastro-stauden.com

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167.1Monarda ‘Capricorn’ – Flowers purple/ red (RHS 67A). Height to 90cm. Dark red bracts. Mildew resistant.

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635.1Monarda ‘Cherokee’ – Flowers pale pink/ purple (RHS 75C). Height to 140cm. Purple bracts. Vigorous. Form selected by Piet Oudolf. Fairly mildew resistant.

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381.1Monarda citriodora – Various synonyms. Common names Lemon mint, Lemon bergamot, Purple horsemint. Flowers vary from pink/ purple/ white (only RHS reference is pink/ purple 78D). Height 60cm. Annual or short lived perennial which self-seeds. Native to Mexico and many parts of the US. Culinary, insect repelling and medicinal uses. Details in The Plant List.

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597 Top 10 - No 8 Citriodora subsp. AustromontanaMonarda citriodora subsp. austromontana – Syn. Monarda austromontana, Monarda Mexicana. Common names Lemon beebalm, Mexican Bergamot. Flowers lavender/ pink ( RHS 77D). Height to 75cm. Strong minty lemon leaf scent. Clump forming, upright type. Native of New Mexico. Easy to grow from seed. Details in The Plant List.

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586Monarda citriodora subsp. austromontana ‘Bees’ Favourite’ – Flowers lavender/ pink (RHS 77D). Height 40 – 60 cm. Annual or short lived perennial. Easy to grow from seed. Form introduced by Thompson & Morgan.

Image copyright www.thompson-morgan.com

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551.1Monarda ‘Comanche’ – Flowers pink (RHS 73B). Height 1 – 1.4m. Rusty bracts. Form selected by Piet Oudolf. Fairly mildew resistant.

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129.2Monarda ‘Croftway Pink’ AGM – Syn. Monarda didyma ‘Croftway Pink’. Flowers soft pink (RHS 75B). Height to 90cm. Deep pink bracts. RHS Award of Garden Merit.

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Monarda in detail: D to I

252.2Monarda didyma – Various synonyms. Numerous common names including Oswego Tea, Beebalm, Scarlet Beebalm, Rose balm, Low balm, Hare mint, Bee balm tea plant, Robin-run-around, Sweet bergamot. Flowers scarlet (RHS 46B). Height 1 – 1.5m. Scent akin to Bergamot Orange.  Important US ethnobotanical plant, native to the east & part of the north west. Naturalised elsewhere in US,  Europe & Asia.

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543.1Monarda didyma ‘alba’. White didyma form, but mine is the palest purple/ pink (RHS 76D). Height 1 – 1.5m.

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552.4Monarda didyma ‘Coral Reef’ – Flowers rich pink (RHS 54B). Similar to Marshall’s Delight but shorter; height 90 – 105cm. Introduced from the Morden Breeding Programme in Manitoba, Canada. Mildew resistance.

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196 Top 10 - No 3 'Cranberry Lace'Monarda didyma ‘Cranberry Lace’ ® – Flowers rose pink (RHS 67D). Height 30cm, a very compact variety.  Very floriferous and good for container growing and as an edging plant. Introduced  and patented by Future Plants. Mildew resistance.

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155 Monarda Duddiscombe 15.07.14 bMonarda didyma ‘Duddiscombe’ – Flowers cerise pink (RHS 61B). Height to 1.1m. Introduced by Sampford Shrubs from Tiverton in Devon. Little if any mildew.

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498.2Monarda didyma ‘Panorama’ – Originally supplied as the single coloured  cultivar named ‘Panorama’, rather than ‘Panorama mix’ or ‘Panorama Red Shades’ (see right). Mine in red (RHS 43A) but others look darker. Height 75cm to 1m.

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589.1Monarda didyma ‘Panorama mix’ (Panorama series) – Widely available seed mix of different colour forms in red, pink and purple shades. Good to sow for cut flowers. Height to 90cm.

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280.1Monarda didyma ‘Panorama Red Shades’ (Panorama series) – A mixture of red and scarlet shades which was the first red bergamot to come true to type from seed. Height to 80cm. Mildew resistant.

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555.3Monarda didyma ‘Pink Lace’ PBR – Syn. Monarda hybr ‘Pink Lace’. Flowers rich pink (RHS 67A). Height to 45cm. Compact and flowers really well. Good for container growing and as an edging plant. Good mildew resistance. Introduced and patented by Future Plants. Subject to Plant Breeders’ Rights. “The present invention relates to a new and distinct cultivar of Monarda, botanically known as Monarda didyma and hereinafter referred to by the name ‘Pink Lace’. The new Monarda originated from an open-pollination of an unnamed selection of Monarda didyma, not patented, as the female, or seed, parent with an unknown selection of Monarda didyma, as the male, or pollen, parent. The new Monarda was discovered and selected by the Inventor as a single flowering plant from within the progeny of the stated open-pollination grown in a controlled environment in Oude Wetering, The Netherlands in 2002.” Source: USPP18367 P2 granted 25.12.07.

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587.1Monarda didyma
‘T&M superb mixed’
– Seed mix from Thompson & Morgan comprising a variety of flower shades. Height to 1m.

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540.1Monarda ‘Earl Grey’ – Soft red (RHS 53C). Height up to 1.2m.

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470.1Monarda ‘Elsie’s Lavender’. Flowers pale lilac (RHS 76C from green bracts. Maximum height to around 1.2m. Vigorous.

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514.1Monarda ‘Elworthy’ – Flowers purple/ pink (approximately RHS 80C) with some paler linear markings. Height to 45cm. Mildew resistance. Form from Elworthy Cottage Plants, Somerset.

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609.1Monarda ‘Eugens Kirschrot’ – Flowers pink/red (RHS 58C). Height to 1m. Not mildew resistant.

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610.2Monarda ‘Eugens Purpursamt’ – Flowers rich violet (RHS 84A). Height to 1m.

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636.2Monarda ‘Feuerschopf’ – Flowers mid violet (RHS 84 B). Height to 1m.

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49 Top 10 - No 2 'Fireball'Monarda ‘Fireball’ PBR – Flowers purple/ red (RHS 60A). Height 60cm. Introduced and patented by Future Plants. Mildew resistant.

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385.5Monarda ‘Fishes’ – Syn. Monarda ‘Pisces’. Pale pink (RHS 65C). Height to 1.2m. Pale green bracts. Mildew resistant. Form selected by Piet Oudolf.

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253.1Monarda fistulosa – Many synonyms, varieties & sub species. Common names Wild Bergamot, Mintleaf Beebalm, Bee Balm. Native to much of  US. Colours and height vary. The Herb Society of America’s ‘Notable Native 2013’. Source of thymol. Important ethnobotanical plant. Details in The Plant List.

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632.1Monarda fistulosa x didyma ‘Trinity Purple’ – Large rich purple flowers (RHS 77B). Height to 90cm. Form from Sandy Mush Herb Nursery, North Carolina. Mildew resistant.

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612Monarda fistulosa nat var ‘Wahpe Washtemna’ – Pale pink (RHS 75C). Height to 1.2m. Natural lemon scented variation of fistulosa.

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Monarda fistulosa ssp. menthifolia ‘Oswegokraut‘ – Lavender flowers, 80cm to 1m tall. Image to follow.

631.1Monarda fistulosa ‘Schneewolke’ – Translates as snow cloud. Flowers off white, light green foliage. Height to 1m .

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150 Monarda fistulosa tetraploid copyright www.pflanzenversand-gaissmayer.deMonarda fistulosa x tetraploid  – Rose scented Monarda. Flowers rich purple (RHS 78B). Height to 80cm. Rose scented foliage.

Image copright www.pflanzenversand-gaissmayer.de

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33.1Monarda ‘Gardenview Scarlet’ AGM – Distinct large intense red flowers (RHS 45A/B). Very tall form to height 1.4m. Vigorous. Green pinky/ purple edged bracts become bronze later in the season. Mildew resistant. Introduced by Henry Ross at Gardenview Park, Ohio. RHS Award of Garden Merit.

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536.1Monarda ‘Gewitterwolke’ – Syn. Monarda ‘Thundercloud’. Darker purple/ red (RHS 64A). Height to 1m. Form from Peter zue Linden of Osnabrucker Staudenkulturen. Good mildew resistance.

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352 Monarda Hartswood Wine 15.07.14 cMonarda ‘Hartswood Wine’ – Flowers rich purple (RHS 77A). Height to 70cm.

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414.1Monarda ‘Heidelerche’ – Pink (RHS 78D). Height 80cm – 1m .

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SONY DSCMonarda ‘Huckleberry’ – Form from Sarastro-Stauden with great mildew resistance. Flowers are dark purple, height 50-80cm.

Image copyright www.sarastro-stauden.com

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Monarda in detail: J – R

320.5

Monarda ‘Jacob Kline’ – Very large deep red flower heads (RHS 45B). A very tall form to height 1.2m. Excellent mildew resistance. Found growing wild in Georgia, US, by plantsman Jean Cline and named for his son. Introduced by Saul Nurseries, Georgia.

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329.1Monarda ‘Kardinal’ – Syn, Monarda ‘Cardinal’. Flowers purple/ red RHS 60C). Height 90cm – 1.2m. Reasonable mildew resistance.  Form selected by Pagels, Germany.

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613.1Monarda ‘Lambada’ – Distinct form with tall spires of flowers arranged in whorls. The flower heads are a mixture of white and pale mauves (in the range of RHS 84 B-D) with dotted markings. Height to 90cm. Tends to be grown as an annual/ HHP. Easily grown from seed.

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379Monarda ‘Lederstrumpf” – Mauve form with height to 90cm.

Image copyright: www.jardindupicvert.com

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114.3Monarda ‘Loddon Crown’ – Flowers purple/ red (RHS 59C) from brown/ red bracts. Height 70 – 90cm. Fairly vigorous. Not mildew resistant.

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Monarda ‘Mahogany’ – Flowers dark red (RHS 46A) from brown-red bracts. Height to 1m.

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164.3Monarda ‘ Marshall’s Delight’ AGM – Flowers pink (RHS 63B). Height to 1m. Excellent mildew resistance. Fairly vigorous. Bred by Morden Research Station, Canada. Not patented.

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556.2Monarda ‘Melissa’ – Flowers soft pink (RHS 75B) from dark purple bracts. Height to 1m. Not mildew resistant.

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 595.2Monarda menthifolia –  Syn. Monarda fistulosa var. menthifolia. Common names mint leaved bergamot, Oregano de la Sierra. Flowers lavender –  pink / purple  (mine RHS 85C/D).
Height to 70cm – 1m. Native to western US. Used medicinally. Details in The Plant List.

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458.1Monarda ‘Mohawk’ – Flowers are a soft pink/ purple (RHS 77C)  from burgundy tinged bracts. Height to around 1.2m. Mildew resistant. Form selected by Piet Oudolf.

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468.5Monarda ‘Neon’ – Flowers lilac purple (RHS 76A) dark red bracts. Height to 1.2m. Selected by Piet Oudolf. Mildew resistant.

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428.3Monarda ‘On Parade’ – Flowers purple/ violet (RHS 81B) with darker bracts. Height to 70- 90cm. Good mildew resistance.

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418.1Monarda ‘Othello’ – Flowers purple (RHS 78A) from burgundy bracts. Height 90cm – 1.2m.

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363.1Monarda ‘Ou Charm’ – Or Monarda ‘Oudolf’s Charm’. Pale pink/ mauve flowers (RHS 75C). Dark pink tinged bracts. Height to 90cm. Form selected by Piet Oudolf.

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382Monarda ‘Pardon My Pink‘ – A bushy dwarf form growing to around 30cm high with rich pink flowers (RHS 61B).  Bred by Walters Gardens, Michegan –  parents, ‘Pardon My Purple’ U.S. Plant Pat. No. 22,170, ‘Pink Supreme’ U.S. Plant Pat. No. 14,204 and ‘Pink Lace’ U.S. Plant Pat. No. 18,367.  “A new and distinct cultivar of ornamental Bee Balm plant, Monarda didyma‘Pardon My Pink’, as herein described and illustrated, with very short compact habit, medium to dark green foliage, numerous medium fuchsia-pink flowers and resistance to powdery mildew especially suitable as a potted plant, for the garden, patio, and for cut flower arrangements.” Source: USPP24244 P2 granted 11.02.14.

Image copyright: www.waysidegardens.com

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614Monarda ‘Pardon My Purple‘ – With dark fuschsia coloured flowers (RHS 71A), bred by Walters Gardens, Michegan. Height to around 30cm. “ A new and distinct cultivar of ornamental Bee Balm, Monarda didyma ‘Pardon My Purple’, as herein described and illustrated, with short compact stems, numerous dark fuchsia flowers and resistance to powdery mildew especially suitable as a potted plant, for the garden, and for cut flower arrangements.” Source: USPP22170 P2 granted 27.09.11.

Image copyright www.waysidegardens.com

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475.3Monarda ‘Pawnee’ – Flowers pale lilac pink (RHS 84B)  with green centre. Height 1m – 1.7m. Form selected by Piet Oudolf. Mildew resistant.

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611Monarda pectinata – Common name pony beebalm, Plains lemon Monarda. Grown as an annual. 90cm – 1.2m. Native to parts of south west US. Edible and medicinal uses. Details in The Plant List.

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358.1Monarda ’Petite Delight’ = ‘Acpetdel’ – “Light pink/ purple to light purple with shades of red/ purple (RHS 64A, 72B, 80A)” (source patent application).  Compact form growing to maximum height. 40cm. Mildew free. Bred by Morden Research Station, Canada: “1. A new distinct variety of Monarda plant having the following combination of characteristics: (a) forms attractive light pink-purple to light purple blossoms, (b) exhibits attractive dense dark green and glossy foliage, (c) exhibits a dwarf growth habit that can be readily distinguished from that of the `Marshall’s Delight` variety, and (d) exhibits good winter hardiness;”  Source: USPP10784 P granted 09.02.99

Monarda ‘Petite Pink Supreme‘ – Unusual extremely dwarf form, 15-30cm high. Cerise pink flowers (RHS 61B). Image to follow.

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598Monarda ‘Petite Wonder’ – Form from the Morden Research Station, Manitoba. Light pink (RHS 73A) flowered dwarf form growing to around 25cm.  bee stings. Good mildew resistance. “1. A new and distinct variety of Monarda spp. plant having the following combination of characteristics: (a) Forms attractive light pink blossoms that tend to be smaller in size than the ‘Petite Delight’ variety, (b) Exhibits attractive dense dark green and glossy foliage that is generally smaller than that of the ‘Petite Delight’ variety, (c) Exhibits a dwarf growth habit that generally is slightly smaller and more compact than the ‘Petite Delight’ variety, and (d) Exhibits good winter hardiness;” Source: USPP13149 P2 granted 29.10.02. 

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641 Top 10 - No 9 'Pink Spider'Monarda ‘Pink Spider‘ – Introduced by the Netherlands based business Armada Young Plants in 2013.  Having soft pink (RHS 57A) flowers, it benefits from high mildew resistance and a compact form with a low height  of 30-40cm, making it ideal as a container plant.

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539.2Monarda ‘Pink Supreme’ PBR – Flowers pale pink (RHS 57A/B). Height to 60cm. Introduced and patented by Future Plants. Subject to Plant Breeders’ Rights. Mildew resistant.  “The present Invention relates to a new and distinct cultivar of Monarda plant, botanically known as Monarda didyma L., and hereinafter referred to by the cultivar name Pink Supreme. The new Monarda originated from a chance cross-pollination of two unidentified selections of Monarda didyma L., not patented. The new Monarda was discovered by the Inventor in 1995 in Rijpwetering, The Netherlands. Plants of the new Monarda differed primarily from plants of the unidentified parental selections in plant size and flower color.” Source: USPP14204 P2 granted 07.10.03. 

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476.2Monarda ‘Pink Tourmaline’ – Flowers pink/ red (raspberry) (RHS 53D) from purple bracts. Height 50 – 90cm. Vigorous. Cultivar developed by Tony Hubert Laval from Quebec, Canada.

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459 Top 10 - No  10 'Poyntzfield Pink'Monarda ‘Poyntzfield Pink’ – Syn. Monarda didyma ‘Poyntzfield Pink’. Flowers rich pink (RHS 57D). Height 90cm. Introduced by Duncan Ross from Poyntzfield Herb Nursery.

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384.1Monarda ‘Prarienacht’ – Syn. Monarda ‘Prairie Night’, Monarda didyma ‘Prairie Night’. Flowers mid purple/ violet. Height 75cm – 1.2m. Older form from Germany (Kayser & Seibert 1955).

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591.1Monarda punctata – Common names Spotted Beebalm, Dotted Monarda, Dotted Mint and Horsemint. With distinct  generally yellow flowers but sometimes white or green.  With dotted markings. The stunning bracts being similarly variously found in pink, white, purple or yellow. Height varies greatly but can reach heights of 1.8m in their natural habitat, but generally less. Self-seeds prodigiously. Native to the US and north east Mexico.

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567.2Monarda ‘Purple Ann’ – Flowers purple/red (RHS 74B). 90 cm to 1.2m.

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443Monarda ‘Purple Lace’ – Compact to 50cm high, with rich mid purple/ pink flowers (RHS 77A) and good mildew resistance.

Image copyright www.jardindupicvert.com

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537.1Monarda ‘Purple Tower’ – Floriferous, flowers deep purple. Height to 1.2m. Mildew resistant.

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620.2Monarda ‘Purpurkrone’ – Translates as purple crown. Very floriferous, flowers strong purple (RHS 71A/B). Height to 1.2m. Poor mildew resistance. Form from Hagemann, Germany.

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338.3MonardaRaspberry Wine’– Flowers wine red from purple bracts. Very floriferous. Height 90cm. Mildew resistant.

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SONY DSCMonarda ‘Rebecca‘ – A form from Sarastro Stauden with purple red flowers to 80cm.

Image copyright www.sarastro-stauden.com

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70.1Monarda ‘Ruby Glow’ – Flowers ‘ruby’ coloured (RHS 53C). Height 50-90cm.

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Monarda in detail: S – Z

386.1Monarda ‘Sagittarius’ – Syn. Monarda ‘Bowman’. Flowers lilac (mine is 84B) from brown bracts. Similar to Elsie’s Lavender but shorter and deeper purple. Height to 70cm. Mildew resistance. Form from Piet Oudolf.

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453.1Monarda ‘Saxon Purple’ – Flowers rich purple (RHS 77A). Height to 1m. Strong growing.

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460.1Monarda ‘Schneewitchen’ – syn. Monarda ‘Snow Maiden’, Monarda ‘Snow White’. Flowers white from green bracts. Height to 1m. Introduced in the mid 1950’s.

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387.3Monarda ‘Scorpion’ – Flowers purple/ red from purple bracts. Height to 1.2m. Mildew resistance.

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502.1Monarda ‘Shelley’ – Flowers strong ‘salmon’ pink (RHS 52A/B). Height 1.2m.

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94 Monarda Sioux copyright www.coppelmans.nlMonarda ‘Sioux’ – White with very pale pink tinge from purple bracts. Height to 70cm. Mildew resistant.

Image copyright www.coppelmans.nl

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73 Top 10 - No 5 'Snow Queen'Monarda ‘Snow Queen’ – White with the very slightest hint of pale lilac (RHS 76D).  Green bracts. Height: mine to 80cm, but  reports of up to 1.2m.

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51 Monarda Squaw 15.07.14 eMonarda ‘Squaw’ AGM – Flowers bright scarlet (RHS 45A) from dark red/ brown bracts. Height 1.2m. Fairly mildew resistant. RHS Award of Garden Merit.

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367Monarda ‘Sugar Lace’ PBR – Syn. Monarda didyma ‘Sugar Lace’. Flowers purple/ red (RHS 68A/B). Height 60 –  80 cm. Introduced and patented by Future Plants. Subject to Plant Breeders’ Rights. Good mildew resistance. “More compact than ‘Pink Supreme’ … more free flowering and darker in colour than ‘Pink Lace” (source: Google patents).

Image copyright: www.zahradnictvikrulichovi.cz

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553 Top 10 - No 1 'Talud'Monarda ‘Talud’ – Flowers pinkish red (RHS 54A/B) from pink bracts. Height to 1.5m. Form from Piet Oudolf. RHS Award of Garden Merit.

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SONY DSCMonarda ‘Tante Polly‘ –  Syn. Monarda ‘Aunt Polly’, Monarda fistulosa ‘Tante Polly’ / ‘Aunt Polly’. Introduced by Sarastro Stauden. This form is fairly low growing with a height of 50-60cm. Pale pink flowers over a long season.

Image copyright Sarastro.stauden.com

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36.1Monarda ‘Twins’ – Syn. Monarda ‘Gemini’. Flowers bright pink (RHS 63C) from purple tinged bracts. Height 70cm – 1m.

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52.1Monarda ‘Vintage Wine’ – Flowers rich purple / red (RHS 60B). Height 70cm – 1m. Some mildew resistance.

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517.3Monarda violacea  ‘The Plant List‘ states that Monarda violacea Desf. is a synonym of Monarda fistulosa var. fistulosa. In this case, this not a separate taxa in this collection. However it remains for now as it is sold as a separate form.

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77.1Monarda ‘Violet Queen’ AGM. Flowers rich purple/ pink (RHS 77B). Height to 90cm. Mildew resistant. RHS Award of Garden Merit.

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.634.1Monarda ‘Violetta’ – Flowers violet purple (RHS 77A). Height to 1.4m. Form cultivated by Christian Kreβ.

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495.1Monarda ‘Violette’ – Form bought under this name, but query whether correct. Flowers violet purple. Height of mine to 1.2m.

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509.1Monarda ‘Westacre Purple’ – Flowers rich purple flowers (RHS 77A). Height 1.2m.

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Grant from Devon Plant Heritage

It’s well known that the scale of benefit versus input is quite high for Monarda. The stunning high summer fireworks shaped flowers come in many colours from white to many hues of reds, pinks, violets and purples. They look great en masse in a variety of different gardening styles from cottage gardens through to prairie planting. The down side is the temperamental nature when overwintered in ground that’s too damp, whilst in the summer requiring some degree of moisture. As a result they can easily suffer dieback and not make it through to the next season. For this reason, whilst I grow many Monarda cultivars, particularly in the developing prairie garden, for reasons of sustainability my actual National Collection is held in containers. The containers facilitate both winter drainage and summer watering from an automatic sprinkler system. Secondary benefits also include the ability to easily compare cultivars and ensure the collection cultivars are all correctly named. In addition, the powdery mildew problem associated with many cultivars can be helped by extra levels of care when more accessible, than when grown within large planting schemes. For example mulching and feeding as well as the already mentioned summer watering.
During this summer I realised that by the autumn I would have to reassess the provision for the collection plants as they were all becoming pot bound. Ideally I would have liked to be able to use raised beds for the Collection, which would be the perfect solution. With this not being feasible, the next best solution was large planters, using one per accession. While National Collections have to include at least 3 plants per taxa, these would all be grown together in this instance. Having sourced 100 x 65 litre planters and by using all of my own 2016 compost and top dressing with bought compost, the cost including compost would be approximately £1000, with the planters representing around £750.
I approached the Devon branch of Plant Heritage to ask if it might be possible to apply for a grant to help with the cost, for which they very kindly agreed a grant of £500. I am extremely grateful for the grant and wish to thank the group enormously for helping me to manage my collection.
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Nepeta accession details currently being updated

The website is currently using some out of date details regarding the Nepeta accessions in the collection. Particularly, some forms were originally supplied with the incorrect names and therefore even though the plants in the garden are now correct, images and copy here are being updated right now. Therefore, for the next few weeks, please contact me if you want correct clarification of any cultivar or species.

Growing Monarda

As well as growing in traditional herb gardens, in Britain, Monarda is probably most commonly seen in the ornamental garden, although they’re also ideal for wild gardens and meadows, including using the prairie gardening styles. The use of Monarda in this way has been helped to become popular by Piet Oudolf, who himself developed a number of the modern cultiars. The smaller forms such as Cranberry Lace also make great outdoor pot plants. They are of course perfect for all types of herbaceous bvorder, with many growing within the height range of 90 to 150cm. Similarly, with colours from white and the spectrum of reds, pinks, purples and violets, they will fit into many planting schemes.

They ideally need full sun or light shade, spaced around 50 cm apart, preferably with some compost mixed into the soil. Most of the forms shouldn’t be allowed to dry out, so a moderately and consistently moisture retentive spot is needed, but in most cases not boggy. Varieties do vary though, with some being more able to cope with a wider range of moisture levels. This is particularly so for the more modern cultivars, which are often fistulosa and didyma hybrids; fistulosa itself growing naturally in drier locations. It’s sensible to mulch annually. Although perhaps an extra chore, in this case it’s important to help the soil retain moisture; also helping to reduce stress in very dry summers. Remove spent flowers if yours is a very tidy garden or, given the right weather, consider pruning flower heads for possible second blooms in you’re very lucky.  Regarding cutting back growth, either leave the dead stems overwinter for ‘architectural’ effect and to provide plant material for wildlife, or cut down to the ground every Autumn. Dig up and divide the plants preferably every three years, either in Spring or Autumn, discarding the centre portions. This not only keeps them looking good, but it also helps reduce the risk of powdery mildew as well as maintaining a strong plant.

Well known as being susceptible to powdery mildew towards the end of summer, as well as sometimes fungal leaf spot, there are some well-tried methods to help reduce the problem, although the best way of all is to grow newer mildew resistant varieties such as ‘Gardenview Scarlet (red), Marshall’s Delight’ (pink), ‘Violet Queen’  or ‘Raspberry Wine’ .  For other cultivars, don’t use high nitrogen fertiliser, don’t let the soil dry out, prune out stems to keep airflow moving and if watering the plants, water at the base only or water when the leaves will dry quickly. It’s also a further reason to plant in full sun if possible. Powdery mildew itself does not kill the plant directly, but it can seriously affect its vigour and therefore its longevity. Many gardeners of course dislike it for the way it ruins the plant’s splendour. It’s sensible to remove and burn the diseased plant material in order to destroy the fungus overwintering in situ. The use of fungicides, including ones safe to wildlife may be considered if necessary.  High humidity makes the problem worse.

Propagate by root division works very well in early spring or autumn, or by separating and replanting the stolons. Growing from seed from early spring works well if you don’t cover the seeds, keep at 15-20˚ C and keep moist; perhaps by covering in cling film, until germination occurs.  Bottom heat also helps. Germination time can be as little as less than a week with this method, although much longer is to be expected if sowing in situ or if not using a heated propagator. Hardwood or softwood cuttings can also be taken.

Harvest leaves for drying before the flowers open and cut flowers for drying immediately they open.

My gardening as therapy

I’ve had moderate ME/ CFS since 2004, and I’ve used gardening to support my mental and physical health, both before and since being diagnosed.

Last summer, when I read the King’s Fund report published in May 2016 “Gardens for health, Implications for Policy and Practice” [1.] , commissioned The National Gardens Scheme, I immediately resonated with their argument that “The role of gardens, particularly public spaces and gardens, in health and wellbeing needs to be given greater recognition and integrated into wider approaches to public health and public services. Gardens should feature in devolution and place-based planning as part of a broad approach to improving health.” The report discusses how gardening might therapeutically be of benefit to children, the elderly, those with mental illness, dementia, disabilities and much more.

I would also argue from direct long term experience that those who suffer up to moderate ME/CFS  [2.] may  be another key area where an appropriate level of gardening activity could be incredibly therapeutic for some. However, it is critical to ensure that potential post exertion malaise, the acute delayed exhaustion effect is very carefully managed. I have ignored this to my peril and it is really stupid to overstep what you know from experience are your limits. Like any other activity with ME/ CFS, I learnt my limits by trial and error, and by using the accepted ‘pacing’ techniques of balancing activity and rest. Sometimes of course that means nothing at all though.

Gardening though, for anyone with ME/ CFS means in my experience not even thinking about any heavy weight tasks. Instead I am thinking more along the lines of appropriate levels of planting, hoeing, propagation etc. It can be really exhausting to do a lot of physical actions such as bending and continual getting up and down, so I just try to stay in one position as much as possible, whether kneeling or remaiming  upright.

I suggest that gardening is particularly relevant to supporting those with this condition. It is recognised as inducing calm and thus reducing stress, both of which can have a huge impact on managing the myriad of symptoms associated with ME/ CFS. Similarly, as an antithesis to less helpful noisy or busy environments, which for me at least exacerbate fatigue, it can facilitate longer positive activity during the day. Equally importantly, it can support mental health, which by virtue of the limitations of the condition, its critical effect on one’s perception of self worth and often economic worries, is hugely important. It directly enables essential physical activity and then brilliantly, there’s something, however big or small to show for your efforts, in a situation where achievement is all too often very limited. The best thing of all though is to be outdoors, to experience nature close up and to smile!

[1.] https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/sites/files/kf/field/field_publication_file/Gardens_and_health.pdf

[2.] The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence  states that ” people with moderate CFS/M.E. have reduced mobility and are restricted in all activities of daily living, although they may have peaks and troughs in their level of symptoms and ability to do activities. They have usually stopped work, school or college and need rest periods, often sleeping in the afternoon for one or two hours. Their sleep at night is generally poor quality and disturbed.”

 

2017 Opening for National Gardens Scheme – 22nd, 23rd & 30th July

The garden is open over 2 weekends in 2017 – Sat & Sun 22nd & 23rd July as well as Sun 30th July. 11.00 am – 5 pm. £4 admission, children free. Plants for sale and teas. Also group openings by appointment for the NGS during June and July.

This year, Hole’s Meadow will be showing over 500 alliums interplanted within this Plant Heritage National Collection® of Nepeta based on the site. In addition, a prairie style garden area started in 2016 and extended this year will be ready, albeit not yet mature. This area was designed around the planting out of many of this Plant Heritage National Collection® of Monarda, also based here, as well as including many other wildlife friendly plants in the design. The herb garden area has also been consolidated and partially moved. A new orange and blue/ purple border is also just being created to showcase the use of nepeta as border edging plants. The Monarda Collection is also maintained within pots in the garden in order to ensure its survival.